Locate Academic Alignments For - Road to Perdition

Awesome Stories Asset: Story - Road to Perdition

Academic Alignment Authority: District of Columbia

Subject Matter / Course: Social Studies

The following academic standards have been aligned to Road to Perdition

Your standards are shown below
Showing 12 standard(s)
District of Columbia
Social Studies
Road to Perdition
1
Ages: 10
Describe the stock market crash of 1929.
District of Columbia
Social Studies
Road to Perdition
2
Ages: 10
Describe the mass unemployment within the country.
District of Columbia
Social Studies
Road to Perdition
2
Ages: 10
Explain the antiwar and counterculture movements.
District of Columbia
Social Studies
Road to Perdition
5
Ages: 10
Explain the changing family systems and roles of women.
District of Columbia
Social Studies
Road to Perdition
4
Ages: 8, 9, 10
Students use nontext primary and secondary sources, such as maps, charts, graphs, photographs, works of art, and technical charts.
District of Columbia
Social Studies
Road to Perdition
5
Ages: 12
Describe the characteristics of hunter-gatherer societies of the Paleolithic Age (e.g., use of tools and fire, hunting weapons, and typical division of labor by gender).
District of Columbia
Social Studies
Road to Perdition
6
Ages: 16
Explain the passage of the 18th Amendment to the Constitution and the Volstead Act (Prohibition).
District of Columbia
Social Studies
Road to Perdition
7
Ages: 16
Analyze the passage of the 19th Amendment and the changing role of women in society.
District of Columbia
Social Studies
Road to Perdition
3
Ages: 16
Describe the human toll of the Depression, natural disasters, unwise agricultural practices, and their effects on the depopulation of rural regions and on political movements of the left and right.
District of Columbia
Social Studies
Road to Perdition
4
Ages: 16
Analyze the rise of social activism and the antiwar and countercultural movements.
District of Columbia
Social Studies
Road to Perdition
1
Ages: 17
Understand the changing interpretations of the Bill of Rights over time, including interpretations of the basic freedoms (religion, speech, press, petition, and assembly) articulated in the First Amendment and the due process and equal-protection-of-the-law clauses of the 14th Amendment.
District of Columbia
Social Studies
Road to Perdition
3
Ages: 17
Discuss the individual’s legal obligations to obey the law, serve as a juror, and pay taxes.

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