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Bagger Vance and the Bhagavad Gita - BOBBY JONES

Bobby Jones was "marvelous." Although he played tournament golf for a relatively short time (from the 1916 U.S. Amateur, at age 14, through the 1930 Grand Slam, at age 28), he made his mark as one of golf’s greatest players. A lawyer, Bobby joined his father’s Atlanta firm after he ended his years of tournament matches.

The son of a wealthy family, Jones was born in Atlanta in 1902. When he was 11, Bobby shot an 80 on the old course at East Lake Country Club. In a 1940 issue of the Saturday Evening Post, Grantland Rice described those early years:

Bobby was a short, rotund kid, with the face of an angel and the temper of a timber wolf. At a missed shot, his sunny smile could turn more suddenly into a black storm cloud than the Nazis can grab a country. Even at the age of 14 Bobby could not understand how anyone ever could miss any kind of golf shot.

By the 1923 U.S. Open, Bobby Jones had conquered his biggest stumbling block - himself - and had found his single best weapon - his will to win. He performed best when most people perform worst: under extreme pressure.

After he left competitive golf, Bobby Jones played only one tournament a year - the Masters. He had a particular fondness for the Masters, since he had conceived (and helped to design) the Augusta National Golf Club. (Briefly scroll down for an animated "course tour.") When he retired at age 28, with 13 major titles, he held a record that lasted 40 years.

Both Bobby Jones and Walter Hagen played the game of golf like they "played the game of life." O.B. Keeler (in his August 21, 1938 letter to Walter Hagen) made the point:

My dear Walter, it’s not only to a great champion and the greatest competitor that I take the hat off my graying old bean; it’s to the gentleman and the sportsman who for the span of more than a quarter of a century has been playing the game - playing the game of life as well as the game of golf...I’m congratulating these games, both of them...

It is against these two formidable champions (Jones and Hagen) that the liquor-drinking, war-weary Rannulph Junah must play the golf match of his life. And he isn't up to it. At least ... he doesn't think he is.

 

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Author: Carole D. Bos, J.D. 5155stories and lessons created

Original Release: Oct 01, 2000

Updated Last Revision: Feb 25, 2015


To cite this story (For MLA citation guidance see easybib or OWL ):

"BOBBY JONES" AwesomeStories.com. Oct 01, 2000. Sep 21, 2018.
       <http://www.awesomestories.com/asset/view/BOBBY-JONES-Bagger-Vance-and-the-Bhagavad-Gita>.
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