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Einstein's Letter - BOMBING OF HIROSHIMA

BOMBING OF HIROSHIMA (Illustration) American History Famous Historical Events STEM World War II Ethics Biographies

This image appears at page 7 of The Effects of Atomic Bombs on Hiroshima and Nagaski, United States Strategic Bombing Survey (published, in 1946, by the U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, DC).  It depicts Hiroshima as it appeared before the August 6, 1945 atomic-bomb strike.  The superimposed 1,000-foot circles provide a sense of distance.

 
 
CAUTION: THIS CHAPTER CONTAINS
GRAPHIC PICTURES OF WAR FROM
THE HIROSHIMA INSTITUTE FOR PEACE

 

On the 5th of August, 1945, "Unit L-11" (also known as "Little Boy") was resting on a trailer cradle, in a pit, waiting to be loaded into Enola Gay's bomb bay. 

The B-29's tail was edged over the pit, as the plane was in-position to receive the nuclear bomb.  After the device was loaded, the crew left Tinian Island for their top-secret mission.  They were flying to a city on the Japanese home island of Honshu.

It was hot and sunny on August 6, 1945. An air raid siren sounded at 7:09 a.m. as Enola Gay’s scout plane checked the weather over Hiroshima

One hour later, Col. Paul W. Tibbets, Jr. and his crew released "Little Boy" at precisely 8:15:17 a.m. No one - including the crew - was prepared for what they saw and for what the people of Hiroshima experienced.

"Little Boy" detonated 1,870 feet above ground 43 seconds after it was released from the Enola Gay. The explosion equaled about 13,000-15,000 tons of TNT. The distinctive T-shaped Aioi Bridge was ground zero. Never in the history of warfare had any weapon caused such massive destruction.

This image appears at page 7 of The Effects of Atomic Bombs on Hiroshima and Nagaski, United States Strategic Bombing Survey (published, in 1946, by the U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, DC).  The aerial photo depicts Hiroshima as it appeared after the August 6, 1945 atomic-bomb strike.  The superimposed 1,000-foot circles provide a sense of distance.

 

Thousands of people died. Many were vaporized. Some sustained strange burn patterns from heat waves on their clothes. Others developed a new illness: radiation sickness. Hiroshima was demolished and its people were devastated.

By the time Enola Gay had returned to Tinian Island, "psychological warfare" leaflets were ready to be dropped on other Japanese cities. Urging the people to evacuate their homes, the Americans warned:

Before we use this bomb again and again to destroy every resource of the military by which they are prolonging this useless war, petition the Emperor now to end the war.

America had one more bomb that was ready for delivery. Three days later it was assembled and loaded onto Bock's Car, another B-29.

This time the target became Nagasaki (because the primary target, the Arsenal at Kokura, was obscured by smoke and haze).

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Author: Carole D. Bos, J.D. 5124stories and lessons created

Original Release: Jan 01, 2001

Updated Last Revision: Aug 06, 2017


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"BOMBING OF HIROSHIMA" AwesomeStories.com. Jan 01, 2001. Oct 19, 2017.
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