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More Phantoms Outside Scrooge's Window

More Phantoms Outside Scrooge's Window Tragedies and Triumphs Fiction Visual Arts

After Marley’s Ghost leaves, through Scrooge’s window, Ebenezer stares outside.  He sees even more Ghosts, flying around outside his home!

This image, by Arthur Rackham, depicts Marley’s fellow “phantoms,” as they wander “hither and thither in restless haste and moaning.”  The drawing illustrates this passage from the full text:

The apparition walked backward from him; and, at every step it took, the window raised itself a little, so that, when the spectre reached it, it was wide open. It beckoned Scrooge to approach, which he did. When they were within two paces of each other, Marley's Ghost held up its hand, warning him to come no nearer. Scrooge stopped.

Not so much in obedience as in surprise and fear; for, on the raising of the hand, he became sensible of confused noises in the air; incoherent sounds of lamentation and regret; wailings inexpressibly sorrowful and self-accusatory. The spectre, after listening for a moment, joined in the mournful dirge; and floated out upon the bleak, dark night.

Scrooge followed to the window: desperate in his curiosity. He looked out.

The air was filled with phantoms, wandering hither and thither in restless haste, and moaning as they went. Every one of them wore chains like Marley's Ghost; some few (they might be guilty governments) were linked together; none were free. Many had been personally known to Scrooge in their lives. He had been quite familiar with one old ghost in a white waistcoat, with a monstrous iron safe attached to its ankle, who cried piteously at being unable to assist a wretched woman with an infant, whom it saw below upon a doorstep. The misery with them all was clearly, that they sought to interfere, for good, in human matters, and had lost the power for ever.

Whether these creatures faded into mist, or mist enshrouded them, he could not tell. But they and  their spirit voices faded together; and the night became as it had been when he walked home.

Scrooge closed the window, and examined the door by which the Ghost had entered. It was double locked, as he had locked it with his own hands, and the bolts were undisturbed. He tried to say 'Humbug!' but stopped at the first syllable. And being, from the emotions he had undergone, or the fatigues of the day, or his glimpse of the Invisible World, or the dull conversation of the Ghost, or the lateness of the hour, much in need of repose, went straight to bed without undressing, and fell asleep upon the instant.

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Author: Carole D. Bos, J.D. 5186stories and lessons created

Original Release: Dec 30, 2013

Updated Last Revision: Jun 02, 2016


Media Credits

Image described above, by Arthur Rackham, included in the 1915 edition of “A Christmas Carol” published by J.B. Lippincott Company, at page 29.  

Illustration placed online, courtesy The Project Gutenberg.

PD

 

To cite this story (For MLA citation guidance see easybib or OWL ):

"More Phantoms Outside Scrooge's Window" AwesomeStories.com. Dec 30, 2013. Apr 23, 2019.
       <http://www.awesomestories.com/asset/view/More-Phantoms-Outside-Scrooge-s-Window/1>.
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