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Student Stories on the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World - Six out of Seven of the Seven Wonders of the World by Jason Noles and Jacob Farber

This image depicts a close-up view of the Great Pyramid at Giza, one of the seven wonders of the ancient world. Each of the 2.3 million blocks, forming the pyramid, weighs at least 2.5 tons!

 

Have you ever thought about any of the seven wonders of the ancient world? Or ... have you even heard of them?

How about the Pyramids of Giza - particularly the Great Pyramid of Giza, in Egypt? This is one of the seven wonders. It was actually one of the world’s tallest ancient structures.

Who had the time to construct this monstrosity of a building? Pharaoh Khufu is the one who ordered the Great Pyramid. It took about 20 years to build, but it was beautiful in the end. Now it is a tourist site for everyone from around the world.

Each block is estimated to weigh about 2.5 tons!!! There are 2,300,000 blocks in the pyramid, and that is a lot! The pyramid is 450 feet tall, but it was planned to be 482 feet tall. That, however, did not work. The Great Pyramid is 755 feet across.

This world wonder was built between 2580-2560 B.C. It, and the other pyramids that are part of the Giza complex, are located near modern-day Cairo, Egypt. The Great Pyramid was built for king Khufu because he believed he was going to die and he needed a burial place.

The Hanging Gardens of Babylon were initially thought to have been created around 600 B.C. by King Nebuchadnezzar. If it was that king who ordered the gardens, they would be located in modern-day Iraq.

The gardens were reportedly created for the Queen to make her happy. She was home sick for her home town where there were green hills, so Nebuchadnezzar made this for her. The Garden reportedly featured plants hanging from a terrace that was 75 - 300 feet high in the sky. The gardens also laid atop buildings and aside of building so they could be better and larger for the queen so she could be more happy.

It reportedly took 43 years to complete, but hey ... anything to please his wife. The gardens were created by putting plants and other greenery all over a building.

New research by an Oxford University scholar named Dr Stephanie Dalley, however, changes the story about Nebuchadnezzar. Dalley suggests that the Hanging Gardens may actually have been created by a different king from a different country. If so, they would have been closer to the ancient city of Ninevah, not the ancient city of Babylon.

The statue of Zeus, another wonder of the ancient world, was created by the Greek sculptor Phidias. He built it out of gold and ivory which he melted to shape it. He made this, in about 500 B.C., in Olympia, Greece. This massive statute was about 40 feet tall and was created to honor Zeus, the father of the ancient Olympic games

The Temple of Artemis, at Ephesus, was a temple that was built around 350 B.C. (in one of its versions). The original temple was created for a non-hellenic goddess, but a later version was built to honor the Greek goddess Artemis (whom the Romans called Diana).

The temple was located at Ephesus, in present-day Turkey, and the columns made it stand at 60 feet tall. The last version of the temple was destroyed in 262 A.D. by the Goths. This temple was made of marble.

The mausoleum of Halicarnassus was built in 350 B.C. by queen Artemisia. This mausoleum stands at the height of 148 ft in the air. It was built in memory of queen Artemisia’s husband and featured many different sculptures on the structure to make the building look different but really good.

 

 

This image depicts an artist's interpretation of the Colossus of Rhodes. Although many illustrations show the Colossus straddling the harbor, that is not the way history records its appearance.

 

The Colossus of Rhodes was a sculpture built by a man named Chares of Lindos. Standing at 105 feet, it was made on the island of Rhodes - then part of ancient Greece - in 280 B.C.

The purpose of the colossal statue was to celebrate a victory which the people of Rhodes had achieved against an invader called Demetrius (and his 40,000 troops and 200 warships). The Colossus of Rhodes - which became a model for the Statue of Liberty - was made out of bronze. For information about the last wonder, press this link.

Original Release: May 18, 2017

Updated Last Revision: Sep 01, 2017


Footnotes:
1) Usuario Barcex, Great Pyramids of Giza, https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Great_Pyramid_of_Giza_-_20080716a.jpg, Aug/30/2017, May/19/2017, https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Great_Pyramid_of_Giza_-_20080716a.jpg
2) Marshalln20, Colossus of Rhodes, https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Colossus_of_Rhodes_by_Ferdinand_Knab_(1886)_cropped.png, Dec/22/2015, May/26/2017, https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Colossus_of_Rhodes_by_Ferdinand_Knab_(1886)_cropped.png
3) Marshalln20, Colossus of Rhodes, https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Colossus_of_Rhodes_by_Ferdinand_Knab_(1886)_cropped.png, Dec/22/2015, May/26/2017, https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Colossus_of_Rhodes_by_Ferdinand_Knab_(1886)_cropped.png

To cite this story (For MLA citation guidance see easybib or OWL ):

"Six out of Seven of the Seven Wonders of the World by Jason Noles and Jacob Farber " AwesomeStories.com. May 18, 2017. Oct 18, 2017.
       <https://www.awesomestories.com/asset/view/Six-out-of-Seven-of-the-Seven-Wonders-of-the-World/1>.
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