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The First Vote - African-Americans after the Civil War

When the Civil War ended, newly freed male slaves had the Constitutional right to vote. These freedmen exercised their right to participate, at the ballot box. Soon South Carolina had many African-Americans who were part of the State's government.

Alfred R. Waud created the original of this illustration in 1867 (two years after the war between the states). Called "The First Vote," it graced the title page of the November 16, 1867 issue of Harper's Weekly.

http://cdn.loc.gov/service/pnp/ppmsca/31500/31598v.jpg

The Library of Congress maintains an original of the print which began its life as a wood engraving. The Library's curators provide this summary of the drawing:

Illustration shows a queue of African American men, the first, dressed as a laborer, casting his vote, the second is dressed as a businessman, the third is wearing a Union army uniform, and the fourth appears to be dressed as a farmer.

Click on the image for a better view.


Media Credits

Alfred R. Waud's illustration, "The First Vote," was published in Harper's Weekly on November 16, 1867. It is online via the Library of Congress. Harper's weekly, v. 11, no. 568 (1867 November 16), p. 721 (title page).

 

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