We may know about a famous person's accomplishments, but what do we know about THEM? What is the human-interest story in THEIR lives? This biography collection features the stories behind the lives of some famous (and not-so-famous) individuals.

Biographies Chapters

Albert Schweitzer wins the Nobel Prize and, after his death, accolades pour in for him.

Dr. Schweitzer returns to Africa after WWI, but then war comes to Africa.

When World War One also impacted Africa, Albert and Helen Schweitzer were sent to a French prison camp.

Although they did not initially understand the cultural of the people they were serving, Albert and Helen Schweitzer learned about the ways of the loc...

When building materials arrive at Lambarene, Albert Schweitzer designs a new hospital which incorporates its cultural setting and needs.

Biographies Learning Tasks

Examining Primary Source Images for Author's Purpose

Cite Textual Evidence to Support Analysis

Cite Textual Evidence to Support Analysis

Cite Textual Evidence to Support Analysis

Cite Textual Evidence to Support Analysis

Biographies Audios

Chapter 40, of Little Women, is one of the saddest chapters in the story.

Do you know the background of "Little Women?" Meet Louisa May Alcott and learn how she based her still-famous story on her real-life family.

In spite of censorship in her time, Anna Akhmatova (1889-1966) remains one of Russia's most-loved poets of the 20th century.

Winston Churchill became Prime Minister on the 10th of May, 1940.

On the 16th of October, 1938, Winston Churchill broadcast a speech urging both his country, and America, to arm themselves.

Biographies Audio Narrations

Making her point by breaking bottles of alcoholic beverages, Carry Nation becomes a temperance leader.

Gone with the Wind became one of the best-selling novels and movies of all time.

Margaret Mitchell named Scarlett O'Hara after looking through books of Irish literature.

Margaret Mitchell found the title for her new book in the lines of an 1891 poem.

Working on her untitled book for years, Margaret Mitchell finally agrees to have a potential publisher see her manuscript.

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