Language Arts

Displaying Results 201 - 250 of 285
  • Robert Louis Stevenson: Meet Robert Louis Stevenson, a writer who lived just 44 years. Although he died in 1894, some of his novels have never been out of print.

  • Robert Louis Stevenson and His Walk with a Donkey: During 1878, Robert Louis Stevenson took a long walk with a donkey in the south of France. His objective was two-fold: Try to forget about Fanny Osborne and learn about the medieval Camisards.

  • Robert Louis Stevenson as a Child: Robert Louis Stevenson's Mother kept a "baby book" for her only child. It is filled with interesting information about RLS as a baby, a toddler and a boy.

  • Robert Louis Stevenson as a Lawyer: Although he wanted to be a writer, Robert Louis Stevenson met with resistance about such a profession from his Father, Tom Stevenson.

  • Rookie, The: Meet Jim Morris and learn about his incredible story of baseball success.

  • Rudolf Abel - A Russian Spy: Rudolf Abel was a Soviet spy, living in America for eight years, before an informer (his own assistant) blew Abel's cover when the informer defected in 1957. The Russians viewed Abel as a significant ...

  • Sacajawea: Description of Sacajawea's grave in Ft. Washakie, Wyoming and painting of Yosemite.

  • Sam Clemens Calls Himself Mark Twain: Samuel Clemens first used his pen name, Mark Twain, while working for Territorial Enterprise, a newspaper in Virginia City, Nevada.

  • San Francisco Earthquake of 1906: Early in the morning on April 18, 1906, an earthquake nearly destroys San Francisco. Why did it happen?

  • Santa Claus: The story of Santa Claus has its base in the life of the Bishop of Myra, Saint Nicholas.

  • Satan Frozen in Ice - Dante's Inferno:

  • Saturn Rings A and B:

  • Schenck and Abrams: Free Speech Under Fire: At the beginning of WWI the world is in turmoil, and the United States passes regulations that may affect the right to free speech.

  • School Busing: The United States Supreme Court holds that separate schools for blacks and whites are unfair.

  • Scrooge Visits His Nephew: After declining his nephew's invitation, Ebenezer Scrooge has a change of heart. He surprises his family by actually showing-up at Fred's home.

  • Seabiscuit: Seabiscuit, a race horse, is an unlikely champion and a symbol of hope to many Americans during the Great Depression.

  • Shadow on the Mountain: Explore the true facts behind the fictional "Shadow on the Mountain," by Margi Preus. Learn how Norwegians resisted the Nazis' attempt to change their culture and how the acts of teenagers contributed...

  • Slave Voices: Slave narratives tell of the horrors of slavery in stories and sketches.

  • Slumdog Millionaire: Slumdog Millionaire, based on the book Q & A by Vikas Swarup, is set in Dharavi, India.

  • Snow White: Legends tells us that the "Snow White" story, from the Brothers Grimm, is based on a real girl, real miners and real places in Germany.

  • Snow White - Folklore: "Snow White" - the fairy tale - has captured the imagination of children for hundreds of years.

  • Spanish Fleet Approaching Lizard Point:

  • Spanish Flu Pandemic: Edvard Munch, a Norwegian artist, shows in his paintings a sense of doom that precedes the Spanish Flu, which kills over 40 million people.

  • Spencer West - Legless Man Summits Kilimanjaro: Defying all odds, Spencer West - a man who has no legs - climbs to the top of Africa's highest mountain.

  • Stained Glass Windows: Stained glass windows are popular during medieval times, and are highlights in many churches and cathedrals.

  • Stalin and Hitler - Allies, Then Enemies: Once on the same side of conflict, following their 1939 Non-Aggression Pact, Hitler and Stalin would soon be at opposite ends of "The Great Patriotic War."

  • Stalingrad: Deadly Battle of WWII: The Siege of Stalingrad is a story of unspeakable horror.

  • Star-Spangled Banner: September 2014 marks the 200th anniversary of Francis Scott Key's visit to Baltimore Harbor where he witnessed the attack on Ft McHenry and penned "The Star-Spangled Banner" when Baltimore resisted th...

  • Stieg Larsson: Behind the Dragon Tattoo: With release of "The Girl in the Spider's Web," we investigate Steig Larsson, creator of the heroine Lisbeth Salander.

  • St. Patrick of St. Patrick's Day: Who was the real St. Patrick? Take a trip back in time to understand the man and the legends.

  • Suffragists: Heroes of the Civil Rights Movement: Women rally to gain the right to vote, which they have been denied for centuries.

  • Supernova Remnant E0102 in the Small Magellanic Cloud: In a nearby galaxy, known as the Small Magellanic Cloud, we can see the remnants of a supernova - a star which has exploded. It makes for spectacular viewing.

  • Susan Anthony: Guilty of Unlawfully Voting: At the age of 52 Susan B. Anthony, a women's suffragist, is arrested.

  • Tabula Cortonensis: Although Etruscans lived in Italy, for many years, people in today's world know very little about them.

  • Temple of Artemis - Its Beginning and End: The Temple of Artemis (Diana), at Ephesus, went through many different versions. One of the last versions became a Wonder of the Ancient World.

  • Tenerife: Deadliest Air Accident: On 27 March 1977, the world's worst aircraft disaster occurs on the ground at Tenerife. After striking a Pan Am 747, a KLM 747 explodes in a ball of fire, killing everyone on board and many people on ...

  • Thaddeus Kosciuszko: Hero of the American Revolution: Never heard of this great Revolutionary hero? You are not alone. Read about him here.

  • The Battle: As Marie stays up late, to play with the Nutcracker and her other Christmas gifts, the clock strikes and strange things occur. The Nutcracker comes to life and fights a battle against a strange mouse,...

  • The Boy Who Became the Dalai Lama: Compelling story of how a peasant boy became the ruler of a country.

  • The Descendants: "The Descendants" is a movie about the lives of the last members of the Kamehameha dynasty in Hawaii.

  • The Guns of August - by Barbara W. Tuchman: Barbara Tuchman's famous book about World War I begins with a poignant passage about the last days of the Edwardian era (when color photography was first available and the Fourth Olympiad took place i...

  • The Help: "The Help" is a fictional book, made-into a move, which portrays real events in Mississippi during the 1960s when Jim Crow laws are in effect.

  • The Hours: Virginia Woolf's novel, Mrs. Dalloway, connects three women in the movie, The Hours.

  • The Imitation Game: Alan Turing used the words "The Imitation Game" while pondering the question "Can machines think?" Station X codebreakers, working at Bletchley Park, benefitted from Turing's answers, to such question...

  • The Impossible: The third-largest quake in recorded history occurs off the coast of Sumatra on 26 Dec 2004, leading to a massive tsunami. The waves overwhelm people along the Indian Ocean coast. Maria Belon and her f...

  • The Invalid: After a wild night of the Nutcracker battling the Mouse King (and his army), Marie wakes-up to a doctor sitting by her bedside. No one believes that she actually saw what she says she observed.

  • The Iron Lady: Margaret Thatcher alters history as the first female British Prime Minister.

  • The King's Speech: The King's Speech is a historical drama film about King George VI who must rise above his stammer to give speeches.

  • The Lorax: Read Across America with "The Lorax," and Happy Birthday Dr. Seuss! This favorite story promotes caring for the environment and the Earth's natural resources.

  • The Metropolis: Marie believes that she is on a tour of a magical metropolis, with Nutcracker, but then she wakes up. Was she dreaming or did Nutcracker deliver her safely home?

Displaying Results 201 - 250 of 285
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