World War I

Displaying Results 51 - 100 of 125
  • Lockheed Model G - Flying Boat: Allan Loughead was an American aviator pioneer. By 1912, he was sure he could make a better plane than the planes he'd been flying.

  • Lord Mersey and the Lusitania Wreck Inquiry: A judicial inquiry into the reasons for the wreck is headed by Lord Mersey, a fair man. By this time, however, Captain Turner is greatly reviled by many who think he should have gone down with his shi...

  • LUFBERY, THE ACE: Raoul Lufbery ("Luf") is the first ace of the Lafayette Escadrille and honored in America's National Aviation Hall of Fame for his bravery in combat.

  • Lusitania: The Lusitania was a British ocean-going vessel able to achieve great speeds during her transatlantic crossings.

  • Lusitania Sinking: During World War I, Germany warns Americans not to sail aboard ships whose route of travel includes the waters around the British Isles. Lusitania sinks on May 7, 1915 with Americans on board.

  • Lusitania's Manifest: Is It Accurate?: Ever since Lusitania sank following a U-Boat strike, people have debated whether the great ship was carrying war materiel during her last voyage.

  • Lusitania - Winsor McCay Animation, 1918: This 1918 animation, by thefamouscartoonistWinsor McCay(1867-1934), depicts the 1915sinkingof the Lusitania, a ship of the Cunard Line.

  • Manfred von Richthofen - Death of Red Baron: Manfred von Richthofen- Germany's World War I ace - was credited with shooting down victims 79 and 80 on the 20th of April, 1918.

  • Marquis de Lafayette: The Marquis de Lafayette became a Major General in the Continental Army of the American Colonies when he was just 19 years old.

  • Masks from Anna Coleman Ladd's Portrait Studio: Before and after casts for making masks line the wall of the Anna's Studio in Paris.

  • Memorial Day: On the fourth Monday of May, Americans honor those who have died for their country. Hear a bugler playing "Taps," and learn about the history of this day of remembrance.

  • MILITARY SEGREGATION: The US military segregates black troops from white troops.

  • Mollie Steimer - Photo and Brief Bio: Mollie Steimer was born in Russia on the 21st of November, 1897. Living in New York, she protest America's involvement in WWI and was deported, by the federal government, to Russia.

  • MORE BAD NEWS: The Spanish Flu impacts the US from the East Coast to Alaska; no one can find a cure. In a lesser-known event, President Woodrow Wilson recovers from the flu, but then suffers a debilitating stroke.

  • MUNITIONS ON BOARD?: There are questions regarding whether or not the Lusitania was carrying arms from the U.S. to Great Britain.

  • Nicholas and Alexandra: Meeting a tragic end, during July of 1918, Nicholas II - whose family has reigned for more than 300 years - is the last Tsar of Russia.

  • NOT PROTECTED SPEECH?: Charles Schenck, secretary general of the Socialist Party of America, believes the military draft is unconstitutional.

  • PICTURES OF CHAOS: Descriptions and images of Spanish Flu from around the world.

  • PICTURES OF WWI AVIATORS: American manufacturers design military planes, uniforms and helmets in an attempt to protect pilots.

  • Pius X Opposed WWI - Buried at St. Peter's Basilica: Before he became a pope, Giuseppe Sarto had a great deal of experience living among his parishoners. As Pope Pius X, he strongly opposed the outbreak of WWI.

  • POPPIES GROW in FLANDERS FIELDS: Why do poppies grow in Flanders Fields? What made the red field poppies spring-up during the Second Battle of Ypres?

  • PROHIBITION BECOMES LAW: Prohibition Becomes Law

  • RED POPPIES at the TOWER of LONDON: Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red, an artistic display of 888,246 ceramic poppies at the Tower of London, commemorates the 100th anniversary of the start of WWI.

  • SCARS from a PRIOR WAR: Ted Narracott, a Boer-War veteran, buys a Thoroughbred colt because he needs a horse to work his farm.

  • Schenck and Abrams: Free Speech Under Fire: At the beginning of WWI the world is in turmoil, and the United States passes regulations that may affect the right to free speech.

  • SICK SOLDIERS: Infected soldiers carry the Spanish Flu wherever they go. When they return to the U.S., the flu re-infects the country.

  • Somme - Deadly WWI Battle: On the 1st of July, 1916, WWI fighting in France intensifies as the deadly Battle of the Somme begins.

  • Spanish Flu and Dr. Victor Vaughan: During September of 1918, Dr. Victor Vaughan- former president of the American Medical Association and then-dean of the Medical School at the University of Michigan - is summoned to try and figure out...

  • Spanish Flu - Cartoon: Amidst the Spanish-Flu Pandemic, which impacted the world between 1918-1919, political cartoonists try to find a little humor despite all the bad news.

  • Spanish Flu Pandemic: Edvard Munch, a Norwegian artist, shows in his paintings a sense of doom that precedes the Spanish Flu, which kills over 40 million people.

  • Spanish Flu - "We Heard the Bells": In the U.S., during World War I, the number of people who died from Spanish Flu exceeded the number of soldiers who were killed during the war.

  • Surprising Facts about WWI: Although the loss of life during WWI was astonishing, there are some little-known facts that are rather surprising.

  • SWINE FLU (Influenza A H1N1) OUTBREAK of 2009: In April 2009, a Mexican woman dies from a severe virus; soon many others are ill around the world. Scientists believe the H1N1 Swine Flu virus is the cause and may spread like the Spanish Flu.

  • THE DEAD PROVIDE ANSWERS: Drs. Johan Hultin and Jeffrey Taubenberger study preserved tissue samples from WWI soldiers and from an Inuit woman to conclude the flu virus most likely came from birds.

  • THE FALL of FRANCE: In 1940, France surrenders to Germany and for the next four years Hitler's forcesoccupy two-thirds of France.

  • THE FIRST FLIGHTS: The first flights take place December 17, 1903; by 1908, Wilbur shows their plane in Europe, and by 1909 builds a military flyer.

  • The Guns of August - by Barbara W. Tuchman: Barbara Tuchman's famous book about World War I begins with a poignant passage about the last days of the Edwardian era (when color photography was first available and the Fourth Olympiad took place i...

  • THE LAFAYETTE ESCADRILLE: Germany protests that neutral America allows pilots to fly in combat for France; the squadron's name changes to Lafayette Escadrille.

  • THE LUSITANIA: In 1907, the Lusitania is one of the fastest ships crossing the Atlantic Ocean.

  • THE NARRACOTT FAMILY: See the area around Devonshire, where the Narracott family lives, and learn about horses in the area.

  • THE PRICE WE PAY: It is those who serve in our military who ultimately pay the price, whether the country supports them or not.

  • THE WAR EFFORT: The U.S. provides 5 million men to the war and begins an income tax to help pay for it. To encourage war support, the government uses propaganda posters.

  • TO PRISON: Schenck is charged and found guilty of conspiring to cause disobedience in the military.

  • TORPEDO ATTACK on LUSITANIA: The Lusitania steers into the path of U-20 whose captain orders a torpedo attack. Although spotted by a Lusitania lookout, there isn't enough time to turn, and the torpedo hits the ship.

  • TO THE WESTERN FRONT: Filthy trenches in WWI Europe are a perfect breeding ground for the Spanish Flu brought overseas by U.S. soldiers.

  • Train Wreck at Dutchman's Curve - News Report: A deadly train wreck near Nashville occurred on July 9, 1918 when two trains collided, head on, traveling between 50-60 mph. Contemporary news reports survive, such as this July 10, 1918 article from ...

  • TRENCHES and NO MAN'S LAND: "No Man's Land" is the open and dangerous territory between Allied and German trenches during WWI.

  • Trench Life in World War I: The October 20, 1917 cover of "Literary Digest" gives civilians a look at trench life during WWI. The picture, of course, doesn't tell the full story of the soldiers' misery.

  • Uncle Sam Recruiting Poster: James Montgomery Flagg created this 1917 lithograph as a magazine cover. It soon became used for other purposes, such as recruiting troops for both world wars.

  • Verdun - A Vicious Battle: Verdun is an example of winning a battle by attrition; the human losses are staggering.

Displaying Results 51 - 100 of 125
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