Facebook
Twitter

John W. Young, Astronaut

John W. Young, Astronaut American History Aviation & Space Exploration STEM Biographies

John Watts Young, an American astronaut, flew to the Moon (during Apollo 10), landed on the Moon (during Apollo 16) and flew the first-ever shuttle mission (STS-1, aboard Columbia).

NASA provides the following background about Captain Young:

PERSONAL DATA: "Born September 24, 1930, in San Francisco, California. Married to the former Susy Feldman of St. Louis, Missouri. Two children, two grandchildren. Enjoys wind surfing, bicycling, reading, and gardening."

EDUCATION: "Graduated from Orlando High School, Orlando, Florida; received a bachelor of science degree in aeronautical engineering with highest honors from Georgia Institute of Technology in 1952."

NASA EXPERIENCE: "In September 1962, Young was selected as an astronaut. He is the first person to fly in space six times from earth, and seven times counting his lunar liftoff.

"The first flight was with Gus Grissom in Gemini 3, the first manned Gemini mission, on March 23, 1965. This was a complete end-to-end test of the Gemini spacecraft, during which Gus accomplished the first manual change of orbit altitude and plane and the first lifting reentry, and Young operated the first computer on a manned spacecraft.

"On Gemini 10, July 18-21, 1966, Young, as Commander, and Mike Collins, as Pilot, completed a dual rendezvous with two separate Agena target vehicles. While Young flew close formation on the second Agena, Mike Collins did an extravehicular transfer to retrieve a micro meteorite detector from that Agena.

"On his third flight, May 18-26, 1969, Young was Command Module Pilot of Apollo 10. Tom Stafford and Gene Cernan were also on this mission which orbited the Moon, completed a lunar rendezvous, and tracked proposed lunar landing sites.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/64/John_Young_%28Apollo_10%29.jpg/367px-John_Young_%28Apollo_10%29.jpg

"His fourth space flight, Apollo 16, April 16-27, 1972, was a lunar exploration mission, with Young as Spacecraft Commander, and Ken Mattingly and Charlie Duke. Young and Duke set up scientific equipment and explored the lunar highlands at Descartes. They collected 200 pounds of rocks and drove over 16 miles in the lunar rover on three separate geology traverses.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/b/b3/John_W._Young_on_the_Moon.jpg/480px-John_W._Young_on_the_Moon.jpg

"Young’s fifth flight was as Spacecraft Commander of STS-1, the first flight of the Space Shuttle, April 12-14, 1981, with Bob Crippen as Pilot. The 54-1/2 hour, 36-orbit mission verified Space Shuttle systems performance during launch, on orbit, and entry. Tests of the Orbiter Columbia included evaluation of mechanical systems including the payload bay doors, the attitude and maneuvering rocket thrusters, guidance and navigation systems, and Orbiter/crew compatibility. One hundred and thirty three of the mission’s flight test objectives were accomplished.

STS-1 Columbia's First Launch American History Famous Historical Events Aviation & Space Exploration STEM Tragedies and Triumphs Disasters

"The Orbiter Columbia was the first manned spaceship tested during ascent, on orbit, and entry without benefit of previous unmanned missions. Columbia was also the first winged reentry vehicle to return from space to a runway landing. It weighed about 98 tons as Young landed it on the dry lakebed at Edwards Air Force Base, California.

"...Young was also on five backup space flight crews: backup pilot in Gemini 6, backup command module pilot for the second Apollo mission (before the Apollo Program fire) and Apollo 7, and backup spacecraft commander for Apollo 13 and 17. In preparation for prime and backup crew positions on eleven space flights, Young has put more than 15,000 hours into training so far, mostly in simulators and simulations.

"He has logged more than 15,275 hours flying time in props, jets, helicopters, rocket jets, more than 9,200 hours in T-38s, and six space flights of 835 hours."

John Young retired from NASA's astronaut corps on December 31, 2004. Among his awards are these: Distinguished Flying Cross (U.S.); Congressional Space Medal of Honor; NASA Distinguished Service Medal.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/08/John_Watts_Young.jpg/480px-John_Watts_Young.jpg

0 Question or Comment?
click to read or comment
2 Questions 2 Ponder
click to read and respond
0 It's Awesome!
vote for your favorite

Author: Carole D. Bos, J.D. 5183stories and lessons created

Original Release: Oct 07, 2013

Updated Last Revision: Sep 19, 2019


Media Credits

Image, NASA. Information and quoted passage, NASA - Johnson Space Center.

 

In-line images:

  • Young's Apollo 10 portrait (by an unnamed photographer);
  • Young's Apollo 16 photo (by Charles M. Duke, Jr., taken on the Moon 21 April 1972; the LM "Orion" depicted on the left);
  • Young was the Commander aboard NASA's space shuttle "Columbia," flying as STS-1 (the first-ever shuttle mission);
  • Young, as a highly decorated NASA astronaut, in 2002 (photographer unnamed).

 

To cite this story (For MLA citation guidance see easybib or OWL ):

"John W. Young, Astronaut" AwesomeStories.com. Oct 07, 2013. Sep 19, 2019.
       <http://www.awesomestories.com/asset/view/132646>.
Awesome Stories Silver or Gold Membership Required
Awesome Stories Silver or Gold Membership Required
Show tooltips