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Can the Shuttle Abort a Mission?

Orbiter Return to Launch Site - Abort Mission Diagram Education American History Disasters Famous Historical Events Aviation & Space Exploration STEM

When America was still sending "The Shuttle" into space, was it possible to abort a mission if something went wrong?

This diagram helps to answer that question. It depicts what would happen if the orbiter needed to return to the launch site. 

NASA's "Human Space Flight" web site provides more information about this procedure—and when it is used:

Return to Launch Site Abort Mode 

The RTLS abort mode is designed to allow the return of the orbiter, crew, and payload to the launch site, Kennedy Space Center. approximately 25 minutes after lift-off. The RTLS profile is designed to accommodate the loss of thrust from one space shuttle main engine between liftoff and approximately four minutes 20 seconds, at which time not enough main propulsion system propellant remains to return to the launch site.

An RTLS can be considered to consist of three stages -- a powered stage, during which the main engines are still thrusting; an ET separation phase; and the glide phase, during which the orbiter glides to a landing at the KSC. The powered RTLS phase begins with the crew selection of the RTLS abort, which is done after SRB separation. The crew selects the abort mode by positioning the abort rotary switch to RTLS and depressing the abort push button. The time at which the RTLS is selected depends on the reason for the abort. For example, a three-engine RTLS is selected at the last moment, approximately 3 minutes, 34 seconds into the mission; whereas an RTLS chosen due to an engine out at liftoff is selected at the earliest time, approximately two minutes 20 seconds into the mission (after SOR separation).

After RTLS is selected, the vehicle continues downrange to dissipate excess main propulsion system propellant. The goal is to leave only enough main propulsion system propellant to be able to turn the vehicle around, fly back towards KSC and achieve the proper main engine cutoff conditions so the vehicle can glide to the KSC after external tank separation. During the downrange phase, a pitch-around maneuver is initiated (the time depends in part on the time of a main engine failure) to orient the orbiter/ external tank configuration to a heads up attitude, pointing toward the launch site. At this time, the vehicle is still moving away from the launch site, but the main engines are now thrusting to null the downrange velocity. In addition, excess orbital maneuvering system and reaction control system propellants are dumped by continuous orbital maneuvering system and reaction control system engine thrustings to improve the orbiter weight and center of gravity for the glide phase and landing.

The vehicle will reach the desired main engine cutoff point with less than 2 percent excess propellant remaining in the external tank. At main engine cutoff minus 20 seconds, a pitch-down maneuver (called powered pitch-down) takes the mated vehicle to the required external tank separation attitude and pitch rate. After main engine cutoff has been commanded, the external tank separation sequence begins, including a reaction control system translation that ensures that the orbiter does not recontact the external tank and that the orbiter has achieved the necessary pitch attitude to begin the glide phase of the RTLS.

After the reaction control system translation maneuver has been completed, the glide phase of the RTLS begins. From then on, the RTLS is handled similarly to a normal entry.

Click on the image for a better view.

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Author: Carole D. Bos, J.D. 5124stories and lessons created

Original Release: Mar 14, 2017

Updated Last Revision: Mar 14, 2017


Media Credits

Diagram, NASA.

Information and quoted passage, from NASA's Human Space Flight web site.

 

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"Can the Shuttle Abort a Mission?" AwesomeStories.com. Mar 14, 2017. Oct 22, 2017.
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