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Censorship at Work in the 16th Century - Burning People

During the 16th century, when translators working in England wanted to provide people with English versions of religious works, the law not only disallowed the process, people were executed for making the effort.

Death, by burning at the stake (as a heretic), was not limited to translators.  People who recited portions of the Bible in English (or taught such words to their family members) could also be put to death.

This clip, from "God's Outlaw - The Story of William Tyndale" - dramatizes what could happen if a little girl recited the Lord's Prayer in English.  In this instance, her father was condemned to death.


Media Credits

Clip from "God's Outlaw - The Story of Willian Tyndale" - 1986

Director - Tony Tew

Writer - Ben Steed

Starring:

Roger Rees - William Tyndale

Willoughby Goddard - Cardinal Wolsey

Keith Barron - Henry VIII

Stuart Harrison - Henry Phillips

 

To cite this story (For MLA citation guidance see easybib or OWL ):

"Censorship at Work in the 16th Century - Burning People" AwesomeStories.com. Oct 07, 2013. Dec 12, 2019.
       <http://www.awesomestories.com/asset/view/Censorship-at-Work-in-the-16th-Century-Burning-People/1>.
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