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Molten Rock Flow Pattern - Earth's Mantle

Molten Rock Flow Pattern - Earth's Mantle Geography STEM Disasters

The Earth consists of layers.  Its largest layer is called the "mantle."  

The mantle is comprised of hot, dense rock.  In this 1800-mile layer, temperatures get progressively hotter.  Those increasingly hotter temperatures start at approximately 1600 degrees Fahrenheit (at the top of the mantle) and rise to around 4000 degrees Fahrenheit (at the bottom of the mantle).

The depth of the Earth influences both temperature and pressure.  The deeper we go, the hotter it gets.  The hotter it gets, the more pressure we find.   

Because of the mantle's temperature differences, the molten rock flows.  The flow is caused when hot rocks rise (because heat rises), then cool (as the molten rocks reach the upper mantle’s cooler-temperature area), then fall (to the area of hotter temperatures).  


Media Credits

Illustration, depicting the Earth's molten rock flow in its mantle, is from John Wiley and Sons, Inc., online via USGS (U.S. Geological Survey).

 

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"Molten Rock Flow Pattern - Earth's Mantle" AwesomeStories.com. Oct 07, 2013. Oct 22, 2017.
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