The Arts

Displaying Results 1 - 50 of 185
  • Abduction of Helen - Guido Reni: Guido Reni created a painting—The Abduction of Helen—in 1631. There is more to this painting than meets the eye of today’s beholders.

  • Abu Bakr and ISIS - Background of a Jihadi's Name: Abu Bakr al Baghdadi leads insurgents called ISIS (Islamic State in Iraq and Syria) and/or IS (Islamic State). Does his name have a special meaning?

  • Accused of Spreading Plague - Jews Burned in a Pit: During the 14th-century plague epidemic in Europe, Jews are accused of having something to do with spreading the "Black Death." In Strasbourg, residents take violent action against their Jewish neighb...

  • Ansel Adams: Ansel Adams, one of America's greatest photographers, started his professional life as a pianist. What made him decide to switch profressions?

  • Athena - Greek Goddess of Wisdom: A famous statue of the Greek goddess, Athena Parthenos, is now lost. The work, by Pheidias, once graced the Parthenon in Athens.

  • Avarice - Extreme Greed: Dante Alighieri's Inferno, part of his "Divine Comedy," is a place where Virgil accompanies Dante as they see individuals who were characterized by avarice ("extreme greed") during their lifetime.

  • Battle at Vinegar Hill: The Irish Rebellion of 1798 - when the United Irishmen attempted to free their country of British rule - ultimately did not succeed.

  • Battle of Gravelines - King Philip's Armada Escapes Destruction:

  • Battle of Gravelines - Spanish Fought the British and the Wind: Robert Adams created this map, "Expeditions of the Spanish in England," during 1590.

  • Battle of Thermopylae by Massimo d'Azeglio: Although beautiful, this famous painting inaccurately depicts how the sea met the land at the time of the famous battle at Thermopylae.

  • Beethoven: In the midst of a bad thunderstorm, on 26 March 1827, Beethoven dies. Even when he is profoundly deaf, this musical genius writes extraordinary music which remains popular. Who was he? What caused his...

  • Beethoven's Hair: Locks of Beethoven's hair, snipped from his head at the time of his death, reveals that he has lead poisoning.

  • Beethoven's Ninth - Fall of the Wall Concert: It is said that when Beethovens Ninth Symphony premiered in Vienna (on the 7th of May, 1824), the deaf maestro kept conducting even after the audience was cheering and applauding.

  • Bernstein Explains Beethoven's Fifth: In 1954, a young Leonard Bernstein makes his first television appearance as he explains (and illustrates) why Beethoven's Fifth Symphony was so revolutionary for its time.

  • Black Valley Railroad and Its Path to Destruction: This broadside, from the 1860s and printed in Boston, was created to persuade people, especially young men, of the dangers of alcoholic beverages. It was issued, among others, by the Massachusetts Tem...

  • Boatman of the Styx:

  • Bob Cratchit at Scrooge & Marley: It is impossible for Bob Cratchit to stay warm in his office because Scrooge greatly restricts the amount of coal which is used to heat the place.

  • Bob Cratchit on Christmas Eve: Excited about Christmas Eve, Bob Cratchit closes the office, at Scrooge & Marley, and joins a group of boys sliding on the ice.

  • Bog Home during the Potato Famine: Misery descended on Ireland during the years of the potato blight. Although only the potato crop failed, famine followed when healthy crops were exported (not used to help the suffering potato-growers...

  • British Victory at Cape Trafalgar : During the Napoleonic Wars, in 1805, Britain fought against France in a naval clash known as The Battle of Trafalgar. Admiral Horatio Nelson employed a new strategy which led to an astonishing British...

  • Buccaneers Raid Spanish Ships and Towns: In 1667, a French pirate known as Franois L'Olonnais plans an attack on Maracaibo (a city in todays northwestern Venezuela). Disastrous consequences follow for the city's residents.

  • Camden Town - Home of Bob Cratchit: Bob Cratchit and his family live in a part of London known as Camden Town. This image depicts an area of Camden during 1839.

  • Capture of Gyula - Illumination: A national treasure of Hungary, this illumination depicts the capture of Gyula. One of the accounts, which survives about this individual, tells us that he was captured for refusing to practice the Ch...

  • Caravaggio and His Religious Paintings: Caravaggio was a working artist during the Baroque Period (1600-1700) who repeatedly got himself into trouble.

  • Carry Nation and Her Hatchet: On June 7, 1900, Carrie Nation walked into a Kansas saloon and starting smashing bottles of alcoholic drinks. Her first husband was addicted to alcohol. This caused her to start a campaign against alc...

  • Cartoon - Disparaging Susan Anthony: Susan Anthony was berated by many different publications as she continued to fight for a woman's right to vote in America.

  • Chariot Race - Ancient Greece: In ancient Greece, artists used vases in the same way as painters use canvases today. We therefore see great works of art, which survive from the ancient world, on vases and amphora.

  • Chicano Movement and Boycotting Grapes: Before Cesar Chavez dedicated his life to helping farm workers get a decent wage, field workers - including children - toiled long hours for unbelievably low pay.

  • Child Labor: Early Americans expect children to work in hard adult jobs.

  • Children in War: Both World Wars bring on much sacrifice and misery, especially for children.

  • Children's Fountain - Story Behind the Iconic Image: The children, featured in this fountain, are dancing the Khorovod. The Khorovod is a type of common circle dance which Russian children loved to do before WWII.

  • Christmas Eve: In his "Nutcracker" story, E.T.A. Hoffman begins his tale on Christmas Eve. Lots of surprises are in store for the children!

  • Christmas Eve in Britain during the Time of Scrooge: Ebenezer Scrooge is a miserly old grump of a man when he is visited by three ghosts (also called spirits). The Spirit of Christmas Present shows him that despite uncheerful weather, people are still ...

  • Christmas with Victoria and Albert in 1848: Prince Albert, who was born in Germany, brought his childhood love of Christmas traditions to his growing family.

  • Class Distinctions - Medieval Life: FromThe Chronicles of Froissart, this image depicts a masked ball attended by nobility (including King Charles VI). Based on an actual event - calledLe Bal des Ardents- things went particularly badly...

  • Codex Vindobonensis 2554 - Frontispiece Links Religion and Science: There was a time when religion and science were linked. During those medieval days, moralisées - such as Codex Vindobonensis 2554 - illustrated how religion and science were related.

  • COMPOSING SYMPHONIES: Although he cannot hear all the notes with his ears, Beethoven writes some of the best-known symphonies of all times.

  • Cry of Dolores - Mexico Asserts Independence: Mexico's independence began with an event called "The Cry of Dolores" when a priest challenged his parishioners: "Will you free yourselves?"

  • Dante Sees the Flaming Red Towers of Dis: As Dante and Virgil reach the City of Dis, they see the flaming towers of a city seemingly on fire. Inhabitants of Dis wonder how these two individuals, who are alive, can tour this city of the dead.

  • Dead Sea Scrolls: Discovered in the caves of Qumran in the Dead Sea region, the Dead Sea Scrolls are the oldest-known surviving manuscripts of the Hebrew Scriptures.

  • Death of Theodoric at the Battle of Catalaunian Fields: In the summer of 451 AD, the Roman general Aetius assembled a military force to resist the advances of Attila the Hun. Theodoric, King of the Visigoths, was among those forces gathered at the Battle o...

  • Depression-Era Worker at a Carbon Black Plant: John Vachon was a photographer for the Farm Security Administration where, he helped to document American life during the Great Depression.

  • Devils with Pitchforks in the Inferno: As Dante and Virgil make their way through the Inferno, they encounter demons with pitchforks. Although the pitchforks are raised, as if to attack, the demons resist harming the visitors.

  • Disaster at the River - Napoleon Leaves Russia: When Napoleon and his men reach the Berezina River, they find the bridge destroyed and the river thawed. To escape a trap, they must build a 100-meter bridge with hand tools.

  • Disease in the Inferno: Understanding Dante's Inferno becomes much-easier when we view illustrations by an artist like Gustave Dore.

  • Dorothea Lange - American Photographer: Dorothea Lange, a famous American photographer who captured the plight of Depression-era people with her camera, took many still-famous pictures in the 1930s.

  • Downton Abbey Gets a Wireless: Despite early opposition to purchasing a wireless for Downton Abbey, Robert Crawley (Lord Grantham) finally gives-in when he learns that the King (George V) is giving a speech which will be broadcast ...

  • Dugout Home - Jack Whinery Family: Colored photos depicting the plight of people in the Great Depression are rare. See a grouping including this dugout home and its adjacent garden (located in Pie Town, New Mexico) which belonged to Ja...

  • Easter Story: Told with medieval and renaissance art, the Easter Story remains captivating to both believers and non-believers, even after 2,000 years. Medieval art tells the story in 2017 just as it did during the...

  • Ebenzer Scrooge Meets Want and Ignorance: As the Spirit of Christmas Present guides Scrooge to various places, on Christmas Eve, he ends at a place where Ebenezer comes face-to-face with the extreme needs of two children.

Displaying Results 1 - 50 of 185
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